ADHD Meds may duble CV Event Risk in kids.

Medscape – “The use of psychostimulants in children and adolescents is associated with nearly twice the risk for a cardiovascular event compared with nonuse of the drugs, and the risk is even higher when the drugs are used for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), new research suggests.

However, some experts are questioning whether these findings are clinically meaningful.

“In this large nationwide cohort study, we found that stimulant treatment increased the risk of cardiovascular events both in the total national population and in a population-based sample of children and adolescents with ADHD,”
investigators, led by Søren Dalsgaard, MD, PhD, of Aarhus University, in Denmark, write.

The study was published online June 23 in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

Longest Study to Date.
The study, which included more than 700,000 Danish children born between 1990 and 1999, had a mean follow-up of 9.5 years, making it the longest prospective observational study of its kind examining ADHD and stimulant use to date, according to the authors.

Overall, the use of stimulants in the population of 714,258 was associated with a nearly 2-fold risk for a cardiovascular event (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10 – 3.04).

A total of 5734 individuals in the entire cohort, representing 6,767,982 person-years, experienced a cardiovascular event, representing 84 events per 100,000 person-years.

Among children with ADHD (n = 8300), there were 111 cardiovascular events, or 170 events per 100,000 person-years, and those with ADHD who were treated with stimulants had twice the risk for cardiovascular events (HR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.15 – 4.75) compared with their counterparts who did not use stimulants.

The use of psychostimulants in children and adolescents is associated with nearly twice the risk for a cardiovascular event compared with nonuse of the drugs, and the risk is even higher when the drugs are used for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), new research suggests. However, some experts are questioning whether these findings are clinically meaningful.

“In this large nationwide cohort study, we found that stimulant treatment increased the risk of cardiovascular events both in the total national population and in a population-based sample of children and adolescents with ADHD,” investigators, led by Søren Dalsgaard, MD, PhD, of Aarhus University, in Denmark, write.

The study was published online June 23 in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

 

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